How To Do The Rock Test And Prevent Sexual Harassment


Trending News: Don’t Want To End Up Like Harvey Weinstein? Try The Rock Test

Long Story Short

If you’re scared about being accused of sexual harassment then there’s a great life hack that’ll help you: The Rock Test. It’s quite simple. Instead of thinking of the good-looking woman at work, think of The Rock beating you down. 

Long Story

The fallout from the Harvey Weinstein scandal has continued following damning reports in The New Yorker and The New York Times over the last week. The Hollywood big-wig and co-founder of Miramax as well as the Weinstein Brothers production company has been accused of rape by a growing number of women including Angelina Jolie and Gwyneth Paltrow. Weinstein’s wife is leaving him and he’s being investigated by police.

This, yet again, is a case of a man at the top abusing his power and should be a wake-up call about workplace harassment.

Guys everywhere are looking deep down and asking: Could I be accused of sexual harassment? Obviously, nobody wants to lose their job or get torn down like Weinstein. But maybe you’re not sure if what you’re saying or doing with a female coworker could be construed as harassment (here’s how to compliment a female coworker)?

Well, don’t worry gents, because Anne Victoria Clark wrote a hilarious and poignant piece on Medium that explains what you’ve gotta do — and The Rock is backing.

The Rock Test is simple. Clark writes: “Treat all women like you would treat Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson.”

So let’s say a pretty hire asks to meet you for coffee and “pick your brain.” She’s cute and she might be interested in you — you are a pretty big deal, right?

But if she’s asking you in the realm of work and not as a date, here’s what you should do: think of her as if she was The Rock. Would you assume a business meeting with The Rock means he wants to sleep with you? Would you grab him by the balls when he walks into your office like Terry Crews experienced? No. The Rock would open a huge can of whoop-ass on you, jabroni.

Problem solved.

Own The Conversation

Ask The Big Question

How common is workplace harassment?

Drop This Fact

About three out of four people who have experienced workplace harassment didn’t file a complaint with a supervisor, manager, or union representative, according to a 2016 report from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s Select Task Force on the Study of Harassment in the Workplace





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